The Sockeyed Blog

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Ahmedabad

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The final stage of our India journey was a fun and full way to finish up.  Ahmedabad brought back to me the intensity of Indian cities.  As wild and bustling as towns such as Veraval and Junagadh are, Ahmedabad is that much more so.  The streets are larger and fuller, crowds are bigger and the air is even dirtier (although less pungent than Veraval).

Ahmedabad is a very enjoyable place to spend a few days.  It has a long history as a city, dating back to its founding by Ahmed Shah in 1411.  The old city is full of twisting narrow streets jammed with amazing historical buildings and suitable characters.  Many Muslims live in the old city as well, and there are some spectacular mosques.

After arriving at the Hotel Serena, we were soon visited by Jabir, one of Derek’s old friends, who speaks very good English and a raft of other languages.  We talked for a while in our room, and then walked over to the wedding feast for one of his relatives.  It was a sizeable affair; they expected to feed 1,800 people.  It was my first Muslim wedding (technically the wedding was the day before), and there are obvious contrasts (besides the multi-day character).  Women and men were in separate areas of the hall, most notably, and ate separately.  The food was delicious.  We sat on the ground on a cloth and a huge platter was brought to us containing big pieces of ‘Chinese’ style sweet-spicy chicken, samosa-like pastry triangles, cumin meatballs, pineapple sweet, and slightly sweet chickpea flour balls in light syrup and yogurt.  The second course was an absolutely delicious rice biryani dish with rich gravy to pour on top.  While eating and after there was socializing with all of Derek’s old friends: Jabir, Maboob, Gaffar, Hafiz and more, all of whom are or were salwar kameez (a standard form of women’s clothing – loose pants and a matching thigh-length top) sellers in the old city.  We were very warmly received, as were Derek’s photos of Asha.

We could have slept in the next morning, which would have been appreciated, but instead we woke early to take a walking tour of the old city.  Meeting at the Swaminarayan Mandir temple at 8am, our guides took us on a meandering walk through many ‘pols’, or micro neighbourhoods and courtyards and narrow streets, and often connected through tiny pass-throughs.  We took in some lovely old architecture, and learned that the city is very proactive in protecting its heritage stock by providing free services of architects and engineers to help in the restoration of listed buildings.  Those that have been improved have a plaque on the front.  The challenge is that older buildings are often owned by many members of the same family, and they can seldom agree on what to do with their properties.  The tour finished at the massive 15th century Jumma Mashid, “Friday Mosque”, built by Ahmed Shah.  I have memories of going there to watch evening prayers at dusk back in 1998.

We were not far from the hotel, so we walked back for a rest.  Derek napped a bit and I puttered, then we had a great South Indian lunch at the Lucky Restaurant just down the street.  When I asked Derek about the rectangular green objects on the floor surrounded by low fences, he said that they were old Muslim graves.  Interesting décor!  They were well maintained and respected, with flowers laid on some of them.

In the later afternoon, we went to visit the salwar sellers.  The streets their shops are on were absolutely mobbed; we were barely able to walk through the thick humanity.  The shops themselves – Maboob’s in particular – were jammed full of women buying salwars.  We visited both Maboob and Gaffar’s shops, and sat chatting and drinking cold drinks or milky coffee.  Around 6pm we squeezed our way out again and went to visit two more folks, this time across the river in newer neighbourhoods: one house was the family of a friend of Derek’s in Winnipeg, and the next was Derek’s research assistant’s – Nerendra’s – place.  I actually met him in Sri Lanka in 2005.  As a perpetual workaholic, he wasn’t there when we arrived, but we sat and talked with his wife and lovely squeaky three year-old daughter, Jeena.  Nerendra eventually showed up at 9 or so, and we have a most tasty Gujarati meal.  Nerendra now does AIDS-prevention work, so we had an interesting discussion about what he is up to and some of the projects I’ve been involved with in Southeast Asia.

It was a fairly late night and a very early morning.  We woke at 5 and arrived at the airport in good time for our 7:20 flight on Jet Airways.  I munched a veggie sandwich and some sweets.  An hour after takeoff and we were landing in Mumbai.  Derek was staying on board as the plane was continuing on to Chennai, his next destination for a conference, so we said good-bye and I deplaned.  Getting to the international departures required a 20-minute bus ride that deposited us outside of security at the terminal, so I had to pass through it again, plus emigration and multiple screenings and boarding-pass checkings.  There was surprisingly little time to kill when I finally arrived at the gate for my 11:30 flight.

Bangkok seems orderly and modern after India, which is surprising.  We zipped in from the airport on the expressway, but the taxi got stuck in traffic tar as soon as we exited.  Yet all the cars stayed in their lanes (there were lanes!), and there was absolutely no honking or chaos.  Just resignation.  We sat and inched and sat and inched.  We got within a few hundred meters of the Atlanta Hotel only to have to drive the wrong way and then sit again due to one-way streets.  I really could have got out and walked, and maybe should have, but instead stayed in the taxi.

My sleep was deliciously peaceful and long – from 11pm until 8:30am.  I ate my usual muesli with fresh fruit and yogurt, and coffee in the hotel restaurant, then spent some time on the computer uploading blog postings from India and responding to a few emails.  Kristi also called and we had a nice chat.

Jeremy Tan happens to be in Bangkok for a month, working with the Thai branch of his company, so we had lunch by his office over in Silom and caught up.  Great to see him.

I organized, packed and showered, then headed to the PSI offices, also in Silom, where I had some internet time to check on details for the Laos part of my trip.  I met with a few staff to look over some of the pictures I took on my earlier visit to Bangkok.  Alex Duke and I had a simple pork-on-rice dinner in a local eatery, then I headed to the Hua Lamphong train station.  I’m writing this from the top berth in a 2nd class sleeper car in a train bouncing its way east to Ubon Ratchatani.  From there I’ll head over the border into Laos and meet up with the PSI Malaria outreach teams.

Hualamphong Station (photo from 2008)

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Written by sockeyed

October 27, 2009 at 18:29

Posted in Travel

Tagged with , , ,

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