The Sockeyed Blog

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Phnom Penh

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I had two excellent days in Phnom Penh, a city I always enjoy returning to. I spent must of my time eating and drinking in the town’s fun great restaurants, cafes, and bars.

My plane touched down in the late afternoon, and I picked up my visa-on-arrival ($20) and was through customs and in a taxi quickly for the drive to my hotel. Vinh suggested the Amari on s.136, a great place just off the riverfront, centrally-located, new and not too noisy. It’s the sister hotel to the Paragon where I have stayed on other trips. My interior room – which I prefer as these rooms are quiet and dark – was $20/night.

View from my hotel to the 69 Bar

On the floor of the elevator in the hotel. A symptom of being on S.136

I picked up a SIM card from the front desk and gave Vinh a call. Before long he showed up and we walked down the riverfront to Cantina, the usual spot, for an Anchor (pronounced an-CHor) and a couple of really tasty chicken soft tacos. There was an opening of a photo exhibition on Cambodian performance at the National Museum, so we wandered over. We arrived in time to watch an excellent dance performance by a group called Children of Bassac. They perform every Thursday night, and high-quality cultural events like this is something that Phnom Penh really needs. Now, tourism seems very much based on atrocity tourism – the genocide and visits to S21 and the killing fields; for culture, people head to Siem Reap. Hopefully the city really begins to nourish regular cultural events like dance, music and visual arts.

Unfortunately we couldn’t actually see the photo exhibition (we did meet the photographer), so we went for more food, English this time, at a place nearby called Sunset or something. Vinh has a massive plate of bangers and mash, and I had a cheese and tomato toastie. Rick Valenzuela, a long-time friend who introduced me to Vinh, showed up and we were back to Cantina for another Anchor. Sue, Vinh’s wife (they were married a week before us), joined us. We didn’t stay up too late; I was sleepy from my travels.

I enjoyed an eggs and bacon breakfast at Cadillac where a group – me, Rick, Vinh and two other friends – assembled for an expedition to the RCAF (Royal Cambodian Armed Forces) market out towards the airport. Last year I bought some excellent new Thai-style army pants that I wear constantly; I bought two more pairs this year, but somewhat-different Cambodia-style one which are quick-dry synthetic and ripstop.

Vinh & Rick at the RCAF market

You wouldn’t expect to find a good burger place in a gas station, but Mike’s Burger House delivers the good. I had a regular cheeseburger for $2, and Vinh ate a double cheeseburger that was as big as his head. He also paired it with french fries that are deep fried, then batter-dipped and deep fried again. Sweet mercy.

Vinh enjoys his double cheeseburger

The 'band shot' in front of Mike's

I rested off the burger in the mid-afternoon, then Rick and I joined Sue and Vinh for a sunset cruise on the Mekong. Although we were invited for free, the regular price of a relaxing and scenic cruise on a very nice boat up and down the Phnom Penh waterfront is $5 including a drink. Amazing. It would be the perfect thing to do after work.

The waterfront

Oh Canada

The Paragon Hotel, where I've stayed in the past

Back on shore, Rick headed off to a small house party and went with Vinh and Sue to their apartment by the Independence Monument so Sue could change out of work clothes, then we rolled through town in a tuk tuk and across the bridge and south down the far bank of the river to Snow’s bar, a great, funky little wooden place with a stellar view back across the Mekong towards the city. A little burger stand out front provided my second burger of the day. I had what’s informally called the ‘oxymoron burger’ – a veggie burger with bacon on it. Oh, and it was good, possibly one of the best veggie burger patties I’ve had.

Vinh and his mistress at Snow's Bar

A pair of Anchors on the bar at Snow's

Next stop – back across the river to a party on the top of the Canadia Tower, the tallest building in the city. Not a particularly exciting event, but great views to be had. We circled the roof deck with Vinh taking pictures to stitch into a panorama. Vinh’s full bladder and a dire shortage of bathrooms had us making a hasty exit, however.

An entertaining American+Swede couple, Maria and ??, went with us to Sharkys, a venue that strikes me as a Viagra ad – a classic rock bar full of homely 50 & 60 year old white guys and freelancing Cambodian girls. Rick showed up.

A few drinks later and we decamped to Rock Bar (aka Zeppelin Cafe), a mandatory destination in Phnom Penh. Again, more drinks, plus sweet and sour pork and dumplings, and of course, hard rock dj’d by the owner, a fixture at the back of the bar, always loving what he is doing. I paced myself well throughout the evening and drank lots of water, so I was not in a bad condition; Rick, who I rode back to the the hotel with (his place is right around the corner), was pretty well lying on the floor of the tuk tuk. It was 2am when I made it to bed.

The Swede, Maria and Rick at Sharky's

Saturday morning found me groggy but functional. I met Vinh at Metro on the Riverfront for another excellent meal. My open-faced egg sandwich was mountain of foccacia, bacon, two poached eggs, hollandaise, salad greens, balsamic and shaved parmesan. The coffee was good too. Rick arrived only moderately the worse for wear. Vinh had to take off, so we said good bye, and I hung out with Rick for the duration. We went by his excellent corner loft apartment on the Riverfront at s.130 (I think) where he gave me a great Phnom Penh Post (his paper) cap and I visited his cat (kind of skittish and clearly doesn’t remember me). We went in vain to try and find a t-shirt he’d had printed at a printer shop (he’d lost the receipt some months ago). Back in our neighbourhood we said goodbye, I packed up my room and took a taxi to the aiport and caught my Air Asia flight back to Bangkok.

A fine breakfast at Metro

I stayed in the familiar Silver Gold Garden Hotel, only about 10 minutes from the airport, which is clean, comfortable and only $20 a night including transfers to and from the airport. What made the experience enjoyable was a street market next to the hotel. I set down my bags and went out to find dinner. I found a stall selling delicious laksa-like rice noodles with fish balls in coconut curry soup, with big bowls of fresh herbs, pickled greens and sprouts to throw on top. This cost about $0.60. I also found a place selling the best mango sticky rice I’ve had, so I picked up two orders, one for dessert, and one for breakfast this morning.

Mango sticky rice and other goodies from the market

 

I slept well, one of the better nights I’ve had. A van took me to the airport at 6:30am, and my flight left at 8:25. I’m 30 minutes out of Hong Kong, where I’ll have a 12 hour layover to visit folks there

Written by sockeyed

November 7, 2010 at 08:51

Posted in Food, Travel

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Leaving Vietnam

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My second day in the field with PSI Vietnam was just within Hải Phòng documenting their promotional efforts and outreach. We started in the morning with a trip around the city with a local staff member photographing billboards promoting safe practices and HIV testing, ideally with groups of men sitting or standing nearby. The billboards were generally placed in strategic areas – places where men drink (bia hơis) or industrial areas where they work.

A PSI billboard promoting HIV awareness

For lunch we had bún chả at my request. Our local contact took us to a place that was quite renowned for it, and rightly so; the spring rolls were delicious – stuffed with crab and shrimp. I ate very well, but it seems the others were able to eat a fair bit more.

Crab and shrimp springrolls with bun cha

After relaxing in the hotel lobby for a couple of hours (I uploaded photos to my last blog post), we returned to the PSI office where they male client team was meeting before heading out for the evening’s work. They practised a couple of interactions with a mock group of men out drinking, and apparently it was very humorous and realistic. After about an hour we took a group photo, then they all rolled to various quarters of the city to do their work.

We met up with a couple of teams (they work in pairs) on a busy street lined with bia hơis. Their outreach was very similar to what I’d seen in Phnom Penh – a worker would approach a group of single men in the target age group and engage them in discussion about condom use and HIV prevention. From what I understood, much of the talk was about how you can’t tell if someone has HIV and that it’s best to be safe and practice prevention. One example they used, presented with flash cards, was that you can verify what your friend says about the weather by looking at a weather forecast and what he says about a restaurant by trying it, but you can’t take his work on whether a sex worker is safe, so it’s always best to use a condom. At the end of the chat, a few gifts – pens, condoms and condom holders – were passed around and the worker found a new table.

A PSI outreach worker with potential male clients of sex workers at a bia hoi

This kind of work can’t really happen late in the evening as the men will have had more to drink by then and would likely be heading to ‘entertainment establishments’ if they were planning to do so, so we were on the road back to Hanoi by 7pm. It was a steady, slowish drive again and it wasn’t until about 9pm that we got to where I would be staying in the northern part of the city. We had some phở, then I was dropped at the Newtatco Hotel, an unusual place which I think was a state-run guesthouse. It reminded me of something out of China in the early 1980s, and the bed was as comfortable as sleeping on a sheet of plywood. Like most nights on this trip, I didn’t sleep well.

At 6:30am a taxi arrived to take me to the airport which was surprisingly busy. There were long lines to check in and for emigration. The flight on Air Asia was smooth and comfortable and time, and Bangkok’s airport was surprisingly quiet and I was out the door and on the airport train quickly.

I checked in to Jim’s Lodge not long after lunch and tried unsuccessfully to nap, so I got up and headed out on the town. For a snack I picked up a couple of buns at one of the ubiquitous 7-11s, then took the BTS to National Stadium. My plan here had to meet up with my PSI connections from last year. From National Stadium I was planning on taking a taxi to meet Piboy, the outreach worker I followed for a few days last year, but it turns out he was an hour away, so unfortunately I could not meet up. My other contact here, Alex, had to head out to check on projects in Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai, so I couldn’t meet him either.

I ambled around MBK mall for a bit, watching people buy cell phones and gizmos, but looking at the price of camera gear, it was clear things are actually cheaper in Canada. I did buy a screen protector for my point and shoot which came to $3, installed.

Jeremy Tan recommended a chain of classy and high-quality spas as a place to get a thai massage. Normally averse to massages, he claims going to Health Land converted him, so I had to check one out. It look me a long time to find the location I was looking for as Bangkok street names and addressing are confusing at best. I walked up and down many streets including the infamous Soi Cowboy (the go-go bars being prepped for the evening’s action, and the bar girls having their dinners). Eventually I simply got a moto driver to take me to Health Land (I had been very close several times). When we arrived he expressed concern that I was in the wrong place. Through hand gestures he let me know that I couldn’t possibly want to go here as the place doesn’t offer boom boom as part of the massage. I let him know that it was OK.

It was a very pleasant place with beautiful wood finishing and fragrant herbs in the air. The customers were mostly women and couples. For 450 Baht ($15) I got a 2 hour thai massage in a nice, soothing room by a stout and powerful masseuse. Thai massage, when done properly, often makes you think, by god this hurts but it sure feels good for me. A great deal of time is spent on the legs, and when you have hamstrings as tight as mine, there were times when the pressure almost made me sing. Two hours of finger and elbow pressure, plus twisting and pulling reduced me to a sack of jello. I had come in with a headache and it was long gone, and my legs felt pleasantly achy.

Looking down on Suhkumvit from the Asok BTS station

For dinner I walked a few minutes over to Cabbages and Condoms, a social enterprise started by the fellow who really brought condom use to the fore in Thailand in the 1990s. The restaurant is in a lovely treed courtyard, and a musician from a music school plays traditional Thai music. The food is very good too. I had tom yum talak (spicy seafood soup) and penang kai (chicken in a thick coconut curry sauce), with sticky rice and fresh coconut water. For desert – mango sticky rice, of course, and a glass of Thai whiskey. The bill came to about $17, which is pricey for here, but certain worth it for the food and the ambiance.

Then, back to the hotel for an early-ish night (although I still didn’t sleep too well). I’ll pack up now and head to the airport for my flight to Phnom Penh.

Written by sockeyed

November 4, 2010 at 20:05

Slow Going in Vientiane

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It has been a slow-paced four days in Vientiane which kind of suits the nature of the city. On Tuesday we set up a list of photo subjects for my time here. It seemed impressive, but I managed to get through it all quite easily. Generally my days have begun with a fairly early rise and a quite-tasty buffet breakfast (mixed Asian and western food) at the hotel. The PSI driver arrives in his truck and we crawl through the chaotic yet slow traffic to the office where my days were arranged. I covered a whole range of subjects including:

  • Visits to pharmacies to document birth control options (including Chinese abortion pills) and to private clinics with Tick, the team leader from last-year’s malaria project in Attapeu;
  • The PSI warehouse plus the facilities of Diethelm, their new distributor;
  • The “New Friends” MSM (men who have sex with men) drop-in centre, including their new branding plus information and counselling sessions;
  • A new text messaging program encouraging people to get free HIV testing;
  • Wandering the Morning Market looking for moms with kids to photograph for the reproductive health program;
  • TB training for staff;
  • A primitive clinic that provides exams and treatment for female sex workers;
  • Outreach to female sex workers in the Ramayana Hotel karaoke bar; and
  • PSI staff group photos.

A PSI outreach worker educates female sex workers about STIs.

The PSI Laos Team

I am happy to have accomplished all that was laid out for me. I’ve had plenty of time to wander the streets of the central city between shoots or after my day’s work. I’ve had some tasty food, particularly phe (or pho noodles) and café lao, the best of both I’ve decided are on Heng Boun Road, west of the Lao Cultural Hall. I also found really good pad thai at a stall where Heng Boun meets Chao Anou Road.

Phe Noodles from Pho Dung on Heng Boun Road

Pad Thai Stall on Heng Boum Road

 

I’ve enjoyed finding a good spot to have a café lao or Beer Lao and sit watching street life or reading a book on my ebook reader.

Lao Coffee, tea and an e-book

There’s really not a whole lot else to write about. I haven’t found much personal photographic inspiration here which is probably partly a function of having spent quite a bit of time here before, of Vientiane not being that inspiring, and of the fact that my last two trips – to India and to the Arctic – were incredibly inspiring.

Hong Kong and Home

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My stay in Bangkok was pleasant and not particularly memorable.  I stayed in the clean and comfortable Gold Silver Garden Guest House a short distance from the airport for a very reasonable $27/night.  They picked me up at the airport and delivered me again early the next morning.

It was unusual to be flying into Hong Kong in the middle of the day rather than the evening.  There was so much to see: rugged green peaks, massive highrise developments in the New Territories, and busy waterways.  I made my way quickly through the always-efficient airport and rode the A31 bus into Tsuen Wan (again interesting in the daytime).  I popped into Kin-yi’s apartment to drop off my stuff and shower, then headed into Sham Shui Po – the computer mecca – in Kowloon to look at getting my laptop repaired.  I found an entire mall of tiny repair shops one block over from the Golden Computer Centre and spotted a guy with a couple of Acer laptops, so I figured he could help out.  He quickly confirmed that my hard drive was kaput, so I walked over to the Centre and bought a new 320GB hard drive for $500 HK (about $80) and brought it back to him.  I left it with him for the night.

Dad arrived on the A31 with Ah Man and Jeremy Lai around 8:30.  I met him at the bus loop and we walked back to Kin-yi’s for him to drop his things off and clean up, then we went for a late dinner in the Discovery Park mall.  Returning home I did a bit of email on his computer, then hit the sack and slept very soundly until 6:30am.

At around 9:30 we went into the centre of Tsuen Wan and hopped a minibus up the mountain to Chun Lung, Kau Fu, Kau Mo and Ah Kei’s family village nestled in a forest preserve.  We ate a delicious dim sum lunch in their family restaurant, joined by them, Ah Man and Jeremy.

We spent much of the afternoon in Kowloon, first picking up my computer (a mere $200 [$30] for service), then visiting Rehman in his tailor shop in East Tsim Sha Tsui.  By the late afternoon we’d returned to Kin-yi’s where dad had a short nap, then we took the bus and train over to Tai Po for the traditional home-cooked feast with the entire Kwok clan.  Dishes included steamed shrimp, fresh chicken, watercress, mushrooms and duck feet, and wonderful stuffed fish.  Ah Kong kindly drove me all the way to the airport in his new Toyota Picnic, a kind of practical mini-minivan.  We dropped dad off at the apartment when we stopped to get my luggage.  And now here I am, waiting to board my flight back home.  It’s hard to imagine that I will soon by in our own bed after all the different beds in all the different places I’ve been too in the last four weeks.

Written by sockeyed

November 7, 2009 at 09:11

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Veraval

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Veraval’s saving grace is that it’s not too hot right now; around 30 degrees or so. Otherwise, the smells, the garbage, the noise – all are quite beyond belief. It is a fishing port on the west coast of Gujarat, close to the Somnath temple. Streets and courtyards are choked with plastic wrappers and debris, and fetid water fills cracks, holes and channels. Smells of dung, rotting fish, pan, and kerosene (which fuels the auto rickshaws) waft around. Cows amble and stand in the road, dogs sleep in the most exposed places, and small herds of pigs run from garbage pile to garbage pile. Sounding of horns is obligatory, of course, but the fireworks seem to have died down.

But it’s still surprisingly fun to be here. It’s a feast for the eyes, and Derek has great contacts from the time he lived here and from his on-going research in the area. We have been joined regularly by Kamlesh, one of Derek’s researchers who has been very friendly and well-informed, and we have run into other people he knows a number of other times.

Our train ride from Rajkot was sardine-like due to Diwali. We were fortunate to have seats since we got on at the beginning of the route, but many had to stand. We were joined by a revolving cast of characters who got on and off at the many stations we stopped at (it was a local train). It’s not a tremendous distance to Veraval, but it took about 5 hours.

The mob descended at Veraval station, and a new mob pushed on and climbed through windows for the return journey to Rajkot. We found an auto and drove through the crowds to our hotel, the Satkar, near the bus station and quite central. It’s a decent older place although our room is a bit dank and reeks of cigarette smoke. Pickings were slim because of Diwali.

Here is a video of our ride from the station.

We are a real novelty here. Very few foreigners make it to Veraval, so we are constantly chatted with and stared at. The most important question is where we are from. If Derek has energy, he’ll engage more in Gujarati.

We were starving by the time we checked in, so we walked a couple of blocks to the Prakesh Dining Hall where, after a short wait, had another delicious Gujarati thali: three well-spiced curries – potato, savoury little balls and bean, plus dahl, roti, pickles, chass and gelab jumen for a sweet. It really hit the spot. Total was 70Rs each.

We rested after that – Derek was really wiped after limited sleep before. After, we met up with Kamlesh and another one of Derek’s research assistants, and Derek shared his much-appreciated baby photos of Asha. With Kamlesh we tried to go visit the port around dusk, but were stopped by security guards when they saw my camera. I didn’t know this, but the terrorists who attacked Mumbai almost a year ago hijacked a Gujarati fishing boat and used it to get to Mumbai after killing its crew, so security around the ports is very high.

So we had cold milky drinks instead

So, we returned to the hotel and Derek and I went across the street to get a late-ish south Indian dinner of dosas and a sweetish yogurt dish called chat.

We had an early night, which was good as folks in the hotel woke up at around 6am and started talking loudly, banging doors, and, in the case of a kid, yelling playfully. Our doors do very little to control sound, so I woke early.

Outside it was misty and cool as it often is at this time of year in the mornings. We met Kamlesh at 8:00, had chai, then walked across the street for a traditional ghatiya (fried savoury dough) breakfast. I walked the fellow expertly making the curly strips and tossing them into the oil, then putting them on a plate with jelabi, fried green chillies and cucumber pickle.

Making ghatiya

Sipping chai from a saucer

A cow on the median

The three of us spent the morning walking the markets of the old town near the ocean. First off was the produce market. I continue to be impressed with the quality of the fruit, veggies and herbs for sale here. All look fresh, tasty and like organic produce back home.

The produce market

Tomatoes!

Next was the fish market, which I could smell long before seeing it. This was less appealing to the palate but still interesting. Fish was piled high on the ground with the exception of some of the higher-value varieties, like tuna. Women sold the fish; I assume that the men were out on the boats. Healthy-looking feral cats prowled, dragging away discarded bits of fish, of which there were many. As I photographed the scene, Derek worked Kamlesh for information on catch levels for different species, the market, and so on.

Fish laid out on the ground

Shark delivery

Girl with a fish

His uncle has a towering courtyard house not far away, so we dropped in and climbed to the top for a great-bird’s eye view of the ocean and town.

We continued our walk through the old town for a ways, taking in the sights and smells, eventually making our way back to the tower in the middle of the main intersection, not far from our hotel. We had some cold milky drinks (rose for me, cardamom for Derek, something brown and mysterious for Kamlesh). Kalmesh went home and we headed back to the hotel to organize things and do some writing.

We had an excellent mid-afternoon lunch prepared by Kalmesh’s wife and mother at their house, about a ten-minute’s walk away. They cooked up a tuna curry, veg curry, yellow rice with big chunks of tuna, wheat and millet rotis, and an array of chutneys and pickles. It was delicious and much appreciated.

Tonight we will try and get back into the port, and tomorrow we’ll head to Derek’s village of Dhamlej, about an hour’s ride down the coast.

Written by sockeyed

October 20, 2009 at 04:09

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Diwali

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I have arrived in India just in time for Diwali. Even at 10:30 in the morning, the boom from enormous firecrackers is resonating off the buildings in the area. I am in the apartment of Ramachandran and Meena in the district of Powai, on the edge of Mumbai not too far from the airport. Derek met Ramachandran on a train about five years ago when Derek joined a conversation in Gujarati. They have been friends ever since. Ramachandran and Meena are a lively and outgoing couple, with two grown sons and a grandson in the US. They have been lovely and relaxed hosts.

I touched down just before lunchtime yesterday and moved fairly quickly through immigration and customs despite many steps that keep an army of hundreds employed: swine flu screening, passport and visa check, 2nd passport check, baggage pickup, baggage x-ray, then finally customs slip collection. Nonetheless, I was through much more quickly than I was 10 year ago.

I changed some money (42 RS to the dollar), prepaid a taxi and rode in a fantastic ancient black and yellow tin can for the 45 minutes to Powai. It reintroduced me to Indian chaos: traffic tore around irrationally, horns sounded constantly, children thrust their arms into the car for coins and candy, the driver cursed a blue streak at everything (even I understood what he was suggesting be done to certain mothers), potholes and ruts were bounced through, and I noticed how everything in the world seemed coated in brown dust.

After some searching, the driver found Ramachandran and Meena’s place, and my hosts greeted me warmly. They live in a very pleasant area with a fair amount of greenery and a view towards a lake. When they moved here in 1989, theirs was the only complex in the area; now they are surrounded by a forest of startlingly-neoclassical highrises with what looks like Roman temples on the top of each. It has become quite a high-end area with many shops and a mass of call centres servicing N. American and European companies. In all, it’s a gentle re-introduction to India.

Ramachandran took me on a couple of walks to show me the area, one after I arrived, and one around dusk. The traffic was largely dysfunctional – trucks pulled out and blocked entire lanes, and people abandoned cars and wives in moving lanes to buy diwali sweets or groceries.

Diwali, the festival of light, is just getting started, with today as the first full day. Buildings are lit up, flowers and lanterns are hung, days off of work are given, and many a firework and firecracker are lit off. It is quite astounding what it legal in terms of calibre of explosive. At night it sounds a bit like an artillery barrage.

Strings of marigolds - Diwali decorations

Designs made with coloured sand are created on the threshold of houses

Nonetheless, I was sound asleep when Derek arrived at about 11:30 last night. Poor guy had flown all the way from Winnipeg via Toronto and Zurich. I continued to sleep well, and found he was already up when I got out of bed at 7:00. Three hours sleep is no good and he is back in bed for a snooze. Ramachandran has just taken us for a walk, and we stopped for some amazing chai across the street from his apartment. When Derek wakes, we’ll head to another neighbourhood and visit his old friends Vinod and Kulpina, whom I met in both 1995 and 1998. It will be very fun to see them again. After that visit, we’ll return to the airport and fly to Rajkot in Gujarat, a short 1 hour flight away.

My full day in Bangkok, the day before yesterday, was really quite successful. I spent the entire time with Piboy, but was also joined by Pinong, the director of the Ozone centre, and Nok, a very nice and capable translator that PSI sent along. The intent was to follow Piboy through most of a standard day for him. It began with a little bit of report writing on his outreach, then we rode a bus to the methadone clinic to get his daily dose. I could feel tension in him before he got the dose, and afterwards could sense he was relaxed and somewhat euphoric. We then went on some outreach together: to IDUs, siblings of IDUs, and female street sex workers. He had a strong rapport with many of the people encountered, and showed warmth, respect and compassion. He chatted and passed out needle kits and condoms, and we covered a lot of ground in the Ban Sue area and also over towards Khao San road.

The highlight was a trip to his fiancée’s house, about half an hour outside of the city core. She, Jeet, is a lovely woman with a glowing smile who met Piboy after hearing him on the radio talking about injection drug use and HIV prevention. She was interested in the subject, so she called in to talk to him and was touched by his warmth. She was a bit surprised by his age when they met – she is 25 and he is 52, but she still fell for him. It was five years ago that they met, and they’ll be married on the 31st.

Jeet lives in quite a traditional set of houses lived in by her father’s side of the family. She shares a small stilt house with her mother (who is not much older than me), and Piboy will move in with them when they’re married. I’m sure that it will be a transition for him as he now lives in a sketchy part of town full of illegal gambling houses.

We sat for some time on the floor of their house drinking Pepsi as I interviewed Jeet and her mother about their relationship with Piboy and took some photographs. Piboy is much respected for the work that he does and the compassion he shows, and his age is actually considered an asset as he is considered mature and settled. I photographed them among the houses and with relatives, then we rolled in a taxi back into town. Piboy stayed out in his future home.

Pinong, Nok and I had a tasty noodle lunch in a simple restaurant, then we walked back to Ozone. I documented a blood test, then left with Nok and we rode the subway then BTS (skytrain) back downtown. Nok and I said goodbye and I went to MBK mall to get a new cell phone. My old one died an ugly death, seemingly suffering dementia and loss of motor control in its old age. For $25, I got a simple new Nokia phone that should serve me well. Its most fancy feature is a flashlight. Of course, I had to visit the food court again. I had papaya salad, mango juice and some noodles that had a few too many entrails and vital organs for my taste.

Back at the hotel, I drank a Cheers beer in my room and packed up for an early-morning departure to India.

Written by sockeyed

October 16, 2009 at 23:47

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Moms-a-plenty, Back to Phnom Penh, Giving Thanks, then Hokkien Mee

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I have a bellyful of Hokkien prawn mee, which means that I am in Singapore Changi airport and have successfully located the staff canteen. Contrary to false rumours and suppositions, it has not closed for renovation or moved to Terminal Three. The old access point has been closed, however, and you now have to enter down a stairwell near the Burger King in Terminal in a ruse carefully concocted to keep joe average traveller out of the place. I, however, infiltrated and enjoyed one of the finest food courts in this city, dining on the mee, iced coffee, black rice pudding with coconut milk and lime juice, all for about $8 SGD. Now I sit and wait about four hours for my flight to leave for Hong Kong.

The rest of my time in Kampong Speu yesterday went very well with the exception that I was incredibly tired. A dog barked all night right next to the guesthouse in the most loud, obnoxious and random way. Earplugs didn’t help – it sounded like it and some of its friends were right in the room with me. So, I spent the rest of the time out in the countryside with a foggy and dopey head. It didn’t help that I slept through my alarm, waking at 7:01, one minute after I was supposed to meet everyone. I was packed and downstairs by 7:10, and Vaesna, the driver and I went for a quick breakfast of grilled pork on rice, and coffee, close by.

There was already a crowd of women and their children waiting at the clinic when we arrived (the three team members were already there and setting up). More continued to arrive as well. There was probably about 30-40 women there, many with young kids and a few babies, which is a testament to their interest in birth control. After registering, they all piled into a room and Pen Sopheak, one of the midwives, gave a presentation on different methods of birth control. The next step was one-on-one consultations; the three team members set up in offices and discussed with the women their history and which method they were most interested in. They followed with a quick physical examination (plus an internal one if the woman was requested an IUD) and a pregnancy check, then provision of the birth control. The options were pills, implants (active for three years), IUD, injections or condoms. The three team members are qualified to provide each one on the spot. I documented the initial consultations, plus the insertion of implants into one woman’s arm, which is not a simple procedure and requires local anaesthetic. PSI is also very interested in showing how sterile their practices are, so I documented the sterilization and equipment handling for an IUD insertion (the woman was behind a screen, but I had a clear view of the team member and the medical equipment). There was a sterilizer provided by UNICEF in place in the clinic, a large cannister like a pressure cooker that sat on top of a portable propane stove.


The conditions in the clinic were basic. There was no electricity while we were working there, and an assistant had to hold a flashlight during the IUD insertion. Nor was there hot running water, although there was an over-abundance of running water at one point out of a bathroom that flowed through one of the offices where the team was working. Although all possible precautions were taken, they were challenging conditions to work under although probably no different than what the team is used to.


It was a lively place, too, as a result of all the children around. Women were helping each other out with the babies; one I saw breastfeeding the child of another woman who was in with the team. It did the trick. One very chubby girl was inconsolable without her mother until she saw my camera and decided that playing with the strap was the best thing ever. A few other toddlers found me interesting and distracting as well. The mothers themselves ranged in age from about 20 to probably 40. Some had one child, others had three or four. One woman was crying during her consultation: she had four children and had very recently found out that she was pregnant again. Medical abortions are available, however, and Vaesna was able to provide her with some counselling (and possibly even a bit of money to help her out).

We were there until about 1:30, then drove back to the city. The first part of the drive went by quickly, but once we were past the airport things were painfully slow working our way through Phnom Penh mid-day traffic, which like Hanoi, works on the principle of critical mass. Once enough cars and scooters and tuk tuks and bikes build up, they then start making their way through an intersection until the cross-traffic does the same. Car and trucks take precedence and will force motorbikes and lesser vehicles around them, and driving in the on-coming lane is perfectly acceptable, both in the city and on the highway. It all works because nothing goes very fast, although I am sure that there are accidents.

I was dropped off at the hotel and desperately needed a nap. I tried for a bit, but decided that I had too much to do before dinner, so I headed out on a moto. First I want to Baskets of Cambodia up on Street 86. A couple of years ago, Kristi bought a great tatami-sided handbag made by this Cambodian cooperative (she found the bad in Agassiz of all places). They have a shop in Phnom Penh, so I suggested to her that I could stop by and pick her up something. The shop was more part of a house than anything, and it was run by two young folks who didn’t speak English, but were friendly and happy that I had made the trip. I bought three bags of different sizes, all stylish to my eyes, for the incredible price of $17 total.

Next stop was the Storya mall for a bit of computer software, then back to the hotel where I had enough time to drop my bags, change and head out for dinner at Sharkys with Vinh and Sue (Sharkys had a very different vibe this early in the evening). The owner of Sharkys is a great expat cook, and he put on an amazing spread for American Thanksgiving with everything you can imagine: turkey (deep fried), scalloped potatoes, green beans, stuffing, cranberry sauces, biscuits, corn, pumpkin pie, apple cobbler, and much more. Everything was absolutely amazing and was just what I needed. We had a good time, but I was dopey from the lack of sleep, plus I needed to get back and pack, so I headed out at 8:30 and was in bed around 10am, with my now-stuffed bags ready to go.

I was up at 5:30 and Pee/P/Pi the tuk tuk guy was waiting for me out front at 6:00 for the smooth drive to the airport. Check-in and emigration were quick, and the one-and-a-half hour flight easy. Before long I’ll be back in Hong Kong and dad should be meeting me at the airport. I will see if he’s any different looking as a newly-minted grandad.

Written by sockeyed

November 28, 2008 at 21:00